D&D – How to Build a Character. 

*This post contains affiliate links.

We love Dungeons & Dragons, if we weren’t so busy, and each session didn’t run around four hours long, we would play way more often. As it is, we’ve only played twice in the past three months!

During the first few sessions the things that take up the most time are character building and explaining to the players how the world works, and their characters place in it.

I love this part.

My love for character creation is what led to Josh running a campaign for just me, but I was playing four characters. They were all female, were different races, classes and came from different backgrounds, but had all come together to form The Happy Huntress Guild. They were the only all-female hunting guild and were just starting out; the bigger, older guilds didn’t like the new competition and were constantly trying to thwart our missions.

This story came about because I wanted to try playing as a different class to my usual Bard, but I didn’t want to commit to just one, if I’m experimenting then why not go all out?

**********

So, there are a few ways start to thinking about a character:

  • You know what race you want them to be, or,
  • You know what class you want them to be, or,
  • You know what they’re like, generally, as a person, or,
  • Any combination of the above.

Each race has it’s positives and negatives, Dwarves are resistant to poison and can see in the dark, but they are also slower than other races.
Dragonborn have bonuses to their strength and charisma, but due to their appearance and heritage they are more likely to be met with caution and distrust.
Humans, on the other hand, don’t have any outstanding positive traits, but neither do they have negative ones.
There a new playable races being trialed and published all of the time, but in the Player’s Handbook*, published in 2014, there are nine detailed races to choose from.

As I said earlier, I usually pick the Bard class, owing to my love for music, and getting inspiration from Sam Riegel and Critical Role.
Josh leans towards the Cleric and a couple of friends of ours always pick the Ranger and Rogue.
These choices, I feel, are more personal. I love music, Josh likes helping people, our friends love to go hunting, using bows, and being stealthy while doing it.
As with the races, there are new playable classes being trialed and published all of the time, but in the Player’s Handbook*, there are 12 classes to choose from, and there’s always the option of multiclassing!

As far as the moral character of my character goes, I like to play chaotic good, meaning that I might not always do the lawful thing, but I do it for the right reasons

  • chaotic evil – most monsters
  • chaotic neutral – wild animals
  • chaotic good
  • lawful evil
  • lawful neutral –
  • lawful good – Clerics, Paladins, Priests etc.

All of the different combinations of the above choices come to 648! That makes for a lot of variety, which can be even more varied when you create your characters backstory.

You could be a lawful good, elven, paladin who is an orphan and was raised in a temple to fight the good fight, or a lawful good, elven, paladin from a rich family who only became a paladin because it’s a family tradition.

Honestly, that’s what I love most about D&D, every game is different, even if almost everything is the same.

D&D for life, yo.

Until next time,
Laura x

BuJo – 50 States Challenge

One of my resolutions this year is to start studying for when I choose to become a US citizen, right now I’m known as a Legal Permanent Resident.

One thing I’m pretty sure I should I start learning is all of the states. I need to know which were the original thirteen colonies and eventually I’ll start on the capital cities.

As you can see from the pictures below, I’m getting better, even if I did forget a few along the way!

Until next time,
Laura x
P.S. Yes, I know I spelled Mississippi wrong most recently!

img_0221img_0124